Our underlying email provider made changes to the network over night on December 5, 2016. These changes created a need to update your email client settings. One common change is the username must be your complete email address.

Below are several resources, including New Webmail, Common Email Setting, Legacy Email Client Set-up instructions and more. The Legacy Email Client Set-up instructions include both Windows operating systems and Apple operating systems. Smartphone client settings are also listed. Please use this information to update your computer, or mobile devices, tablet or smartphone. Hit the “+” sign to expand the text info for each drop down topic.

You may call our Support Desk 24 x 7 number 1-877-433-2606 for assistance.

New Webmail

Webmail

If you would like an alternative to using an email client you may use our Webmail interface, available to any device with an Internet connection and a browser.

Frequently Asked Questions

Legacy Email Client Setup

Choose your Operating System (OS) and email program for detailed setup instructions.

 

Webmail

If you would like an alternative to using an email client you may use our webmail interface, available to any device with an Internet connection and a browser.
Common Email Settings

Common Settings

The following settings are provided to help you configure commonly used Internet client software for use with your connection and email.

 

Username: username@partnercom.net
Incoming Email Username: username@partnercom.net
Incoming Mail (IMAP) Server: imap.partnercom.net

Port (143)

Incoming Mail (POP3) Server: mail.partnercom.net

Port (110)

Outgoing Mail (SMTP) Server: mail.partnercom.net

Port (587)

Outgoing SMTP Username: username@partnercom.net
Your Email address: username@partnercom.net
Return or reply-to address: username@partnercom.net
partnercom Webmail: http://webmail.partnercom.net/
Domain Name: partnercom.net
IP Address: Assigned by server

 

Legacy Email Client Set-up

Legacy Email Client Setup

Choose your Operating System (OS) and email program for detailed setup instructions.

 

Windows
Apple/Mac OSX
Smart Phones
Internet Help Desk Support

Toll-free Help Desk – Partnercom.net Call Toll FREE 1-877-433-2606

Feel free to contact the Help Desk if you are having an internet problem. If possible, please have the following information available so our Tech Support Staff can assist you more quickly:

  • Know your username
  • Know your password
  • Know your e-mail address
  • Know your security code (usually mother’s maidenname)
  • Know what brand and model of computer you have,i.e. IBM compatible, Macintosh, etc.
  • Know what operating system your computer uses,i.e. Windows 98, Macintosh OS 9, etc.
  • Know what browser you are using, i.e. InternetExplorer 5.0, Netscape 4.7, etc.
  • Know what brand and model of modem you use.
  • Write down any error messages that may be appearingwhen you are online.
  • If possible, be at your computer with it on andrunning when you call the Help Desk.
  • Remember, for billing inquiries or changes to your account call Customer Service at 1-877-433-7701.
Utilities

Utilities

Information and links to Internet related software for web browsers and email clients. You can also find software for your ftp, telnet, newsgroup and other Internet needs.

Internet Utilities

The following Internet software links are for use with your netINS, Inc. Internet account.

Please note: This software is not manufactured by, nor is any guarantee on its functionality made by, netINS, Inc.. If you experience problems with these programs, please contact the manufacturer of the software directly.

Web Browsers

The following links are provided to help you locate and configure Windows and Macintosh Internet client software for use with your netINS, Inc. account. netINS, Inc. assumes no responsibility for any of these programs, and provides this information without any representation or endorsement. netINS, Inc. can only provide support for the software it distributes.

Email Clients

The following links are provided to help you locate and configure Windows and Macintosh Internet client software for use with your netINS, Inc. account. netINS, Inc. assumes no responsibility for any of these programs, and provides this information without any representation or endorsement. netINS, Inc. can only provide support for the software it distributes.

File Transfer Protocol (FTP)

The following links are provided to help you locate and configure Windows and Macintosh Internet client software for use with your netINS, Inc. account. netINS, Inc. assumes no responsibility for any of these programs, and provides this information without any representation or endorsement. netINS, Inc. can only provide support for the software it distributes.

Windows:

Apple:

Telnet

The following links are provided to help you locate and configure Windows and Macintosh Internet client software for use with your netINS, Inc. account. netINS, Inc. assumes no responsibility for any of these programs, and provides this information without any representation or endorsement. netINS, Inc. can only provide support for the software it distributes.

Windows:

Apple:

Zipping and Unzipping

The following links are provided to help you locate and configure Windows and Macintosh Internet client software for use with your netINS, Inc. account. netINS, Inc. assumes no responsibility for any of these programs, and provides this information without any representation or endorsement. netINS, Inc. can only provide support for the software it distributes.

Windows:

Apple:

SPAM

To manage your spam filter, log in here.

General Issues (with conversion)

  1. I have setup email forwarding to another account, will that continue to work?
  2. If I am using a “vacation auto-responder” will that continue to work?
  3. What approach should I take if I want to be “aggressive” about filtering Spam?
  4. What approach should I take if I am want to make sure as little “legitimate” email is filtered as possible?
  5. How do I view the “SpamFolder” that suspected junk email is being filtered to?
  6. Will messages in my “SpamFolder” be deleted by the filter after a period of time has passed?

Spam Filter settings

  1. If I added rules on the webmail system will they be moved over to the new system?
  2. How can I “whitelist/blacklist” an email address?
  3. Why does the spam show as being quarantined?
  4. What are the differences between spam filtering levels?
  5. Do I get a spam report with this new spam filter?

Changing Spam Filters

  1. If I change my mind on how my filters are set up can I change them?
  2. What do the different filter actions do

General Issues

1. I have setup email forwarding to another account, will that continue to work?

If you were using the old Spam Filter your existing email forwarding setup will be carried over to the new system in our conversion.

If you would like to set up email forwarding you will need to log into https://webmail.netins.net/pronto/ and click “Preferences” at the top of the page. From here, click “Mail Control” on the left and select the “Redirect All Mail To” tab. Here you can Enable the forward and then enter the email address you would like to forward to in the field provided. Be sure to click “Save” to save your settings.
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2. If I am using a “vacation auto-responder” will that continue to work?

“Vacation auto-responder” functionality will unaffected by the conversion.

If you would like to set up a new vacation message, simply log into https://webmail.netins.net/pronto/ and click “Preferences” at the top of the page. Select “Mail Control” on the left. You should be on the “Vacation Message” tab. Here you can enable the Vacation Message and add in what you would like to say in the field provided. Be sure to click “Save” to save your settings.

Beware, this is a tool that can be abused by people sending spam. Automatically sending a message upon receipt of an email can alert the junk mail sender that your account is active.
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3. What approach should I take if I want to be “aggressive” about filtering Spam?

The system flags messages that have suspicious content and sorts them into one of the danger zones based on the potential harm they could cause to you, or your computer. In increasing danger, mail is classified into the following zones:

Green Zone: Junk, including unsolicited advertising
Yellow Zone: Suspicious, including blank, forged, foreign, and those with certain attachments
Red Zone: Potentially dangerous, including phishing emails, viruses, and adult content

Depending on how aggressively you’d like to filter your email email, you can configure each of the filtering categories to block the messages (delete them immediately), quarantine the messages for review, forward the messages to your mailbox with a tag added to the subject line, or allow the messages to pass directly to your mailbox without a tag.

In addition specific emails, domains or IP addresses which you do not want to receive email from can be added to your “Enemies” list (also known as a blacklist), you can add people to this by selecting the Policies tab. Scroll down to the Enemies section and enter the email address, domain, IP address, or other identifying information for those you’d like to block.
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4. What approach should I take if I want to make sure the smallest amount of “legitimate” email is filtered?

Very few legitimate emails should be flagged as spam, however if one does get flagged you can remove it by logging into the http://spam.netins.net/console, selecting the message you want to release from the Quarantine tab and clicking on the Release Email icon. You can also choose to add this person to your “Friends” list (also called a white list).

Mail from anyone in your Friends list will be exempt from filtering, you can add people to this by selecting the Policies tab. Scroll down to the Friends section and enter the email address, domain, IP address, or other identifying information to the list, all future email from this source will be delivered to your inbox.
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5. How do I view the “SpamFolder” that suspected junk email is being filtered to?

To view the “SpamFolder” log into http://spam.netins.net/console. Click on the Quarantine tab and you will see a list of all messages currently being held by the server.

Very few legitimate emails should be flagged as spam, however if one does get flagged you can remove it by logging into https://spam.netins.net/console, selecting the message you want to release from the Quarantine tab and clicking on the Release Email icon.
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6. Will messages in my “SpamFolder” be deleted by the filter after a period of time has passed?

With our new spamfiltering solution junk mail will no longer be stored on in webmail, and will no longer be counted against your mail quota. However, spam email that has been left in the spam filter for more than 35 days will be removed.

It is still important to check the messages in your SpamFolder regularly to ensure that messages you wish to keep have not been inadvertantly been blocked..
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Spam Filter settings

1. If I added rules on the webmail system will they be moved over to the new system?

Any Rules existing in webmail, that are related to spam prior to the switch will not be transferable as we are switching to an entirely new spamfilter interface. The rules relating to webmail will stay the way they are. More information about setting up rules in webmail can be found here.
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2. How can I “whitelist/blacklist” an email address?

Whitelist/Friend
The Friends Whitelist contains email addresses and domains of those individuals and organizations that you trust.

To add an email address to the Friends Whitelist take the following steps:

  • Click on the Policies tab.
  • In the text box in the Friends area, enter the email address, domain name, or IP address to add to the Friends list.
    1. Click + (the plus sign) button to add it to the Friends list.Blacklist/Enemy
      If you have a legitimate sender that you do not want to receive further email from, you can add an email address or domain to the Enemies blacklist.
    2. From the Personal Dashboard, select the Policies tab.
    3. Scroll down to the Enemies section and enter the email address, domain, IP address, IP address / mask, or country code.

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3. Why does the spam show as being quarantined?

This is done to give you the option to look at the messages before deleting them or delivering them to your inbox.
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4. What are the differences between spam filtering levels?

Red flagged emails are:

  1. Spam emails: emails that somebody sends you unsolicited and are bulk messages.
  2. Viruses: harmful software that can damage your computer.
  3. Phishing emails: emails that people send you to attempt getting sensitive information such as usernames, passwords and credit card information by posing as a trustworthy source.
  4. Adult content.

Yellow flagged emails are:

  1. Blank emails: spammers send these blanks messages to verify recipient addresses
  2. Forged emails: a forged email is a message that was not sent from the domain in the “From” field of
  3. Foreign languages: depending upon the settings applied by your email administrator, you may have the option to block email that contains foreign characters. A lot of spam is sent using Russian, Cyrillic, Chinese, Korean, and Japanese non-English character sets. If you normally receive email in these languages, you can configure your settings so that these messages will be sent to your inbox. the message. These messages are often from phishing or other potentially dangerous sources.

Green flagged emails are:

Junk email is unwanted marketing material, advertisements, sales pitches, and product descriptions.
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5. Do I get a spam report with this new spam filter?

Yes it is called the Spam Digest and has two main functions.

It provides a:

  1. List of your quarantined email identified as spam, junk, phishing, or containing a virus or other dangerous content since the last digest.
  2. Entryway to your personal dashboard where you can manage your account and customize your digest. You can review quarantined messages and release them if needed.

You can choose how often you want to have your spam report delivered, never, daily, weekly or monthly.
You can also choose how you want to format your spamreport.
And what zones you want to receive in your spamreport
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Changing Spam Filters

1. If I change my mind on how my filters are set up can I change them?

Absolutely! At any time you can log back into the system to make changes. Simply point your web browser to https://spam.netins.net/console and click on the Settings tab if you wish to make changes to your Spam Reporting. You can also click on the Policies Tab to change how each zone filters messages or edit your Friend/Enemy lists.
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2. What do the different filter actions do?

The filter Actions tell the spamfilter what to do with each message that it thinks is spam, viral, fraudulant, adult, phishing or junk.

  • Allow, lets any messages in the selected catagory go through. For example if you selected Allow under the Junk section. It would allow any emails the spamfilter though were classified as “Junk” to pass to your inbox.
  • Quarantine, sends any email in the selected catagory that is thinks qualifies as spam to the Quarantine section in the spamfilter.
  • Markup, adds a line of text of your choosing to the begining of the subject line for the section it’s selected for. This option is used if you wish to setup rules in your email program to have them delivered and grab these messages and put them in a folder in your email.
  • Block, any messages in the section set for block will delete any emails that are clasified by that section. For example any emails with a virus detected in them are automaticly deleted since that section is set to Block.
Security Utilities

The more you know about Internet security, the better you’ll know how to protect yourself. Here are some resources we hope you’ll find useful.

The following links are provided to help you locate and configure Windows and Macintosh Internet software for use with your netINS, Inc. account.

Please note: This software is not manufactured by, nor is any guarantee on its functionality made by, netINS, Inc.. If you experience problems with these programs, please contact the manufacturer of the software directly.

Setup your SPAM filters
FAQs about the netINS, Inc. SPAM filters.

Anti-Virus Software:
AVG Anti-Virus (free)
Avast! Antivirus
E-mail Hoaxes
McAfee virus scan
Norton Anti-Virus
PC-cillin
Stinger (virus removal tool)
The cleaner (trojan removal)
Trendmicro free online scan

Adware/Spyware Removal Software:
Ad-Aware

Windows Update:
Windows Update

Apple Security:
Security Updates
Software Patches
General Security

General Computer Security:
CERT
Security Focus

Router Manufactures:
3com
Belkin
D-link
Linksys
Netgear
SMC

Firewall Software:
BlackICE
Kerio
Sygate
Tiny Firewall
ZoneAlarm

Spam & Network Abuse Tools:
How to find headers
Reading email headers
ARIN whois
LANIC whois
RIPE whois
APNIC whois
Domain whois
Sam Spade
Spam Cop

Windows File Sharing Enabling/Disabling:
Windows 98, 98SE, & ME
Windows 2000 Professional
Windows XP

Network Security Testing:
Gibson Research (Shields-Up)
Symantec Security Check

Network Security

Network Security

Anyone using a broadband Internet connection should be aware of the risks and hazards of having an always-on Internet connection. You may not realize it, but your computer is open to hackers and prying eyes as long as it is turned on if you have a high-speed Internet connection.

Should I be worried about my computers security?

In one word, yes. Security of your system means that it will not be used to hack/attack other people’s computer, spread viruses, or inadvertently share pirated content. It also means that your credit card information and any other personal information on your computer stays safe. Think of computer security in this way – would you leave your house unlocked all day, every day, even if you were out of town? Most people would answer no. If you wouldn’t leave your house unprotected like that, why would you leave your computer vulnerable to attack or spying? Most people’s computers contain sensitive information in the form of personal emails, and possibly credit card numbers left over from online purchases. With this in mind, most people would want this information under lock and key. Read on about how to protect your computer on the Internet.

Home PC’s which are the only computer connected to the Internet

Personal firewalls like McAffe firewall, Zonealarm, or BlackIce Defender are a good start. These programs block any attempts to communicate with your computer that were not initiated by the user. This can include hacking attempts, some popup ads, worms, and a variety of other things that you don’t want on your computer. The best thing about these programs though, is that they allow you to identify the address of the person attempting to gain access to your computer. This allows you to contact our abuse department and report them, as many attacks are simply other users like you, who accidentally got infected with a virus.

Another way to protect your computer is to make sure it is always up-to-date with the latest security patches from Microsoft. Security holes exist in every Operating System, and most manufacturers provide intermittent updates. The latest security issues that you’ve probably heard about (MS Blaster, Welchia) have been related to security updates. In both cases, the patches were released a month before the worms hit the Internet. Anyone that had patched their systems before that would not have been vulnerable. This is another example of how something small can save you a lot of hassle.

Home PC’s with multiple systems connected to a Hub

A hub is a simple sharing device that allows several computers to access the Internet at once. It is not intelligent, and functions identically to having a single computer on the Internet. This may or may not work with all high-speed services. All of the precautions listed for single computers need to be taken into consideration if you are sharing your Internet connection with a hub.

Home PC’s with multiple systems connected to a Router

A router is an intelligent piece of hardware that allows multiple systems to connect to the Internet at once. Many routers have a built-in firewall. This will normally protect your computer from most attacks, but you still need to take care to keep your computer up-to-date with the latest security patches and virus software.

Most routers, as soon as you purchase them, need what is called a “firmware upgrade”. This is just a simple piece of software, normally downloaded from the manufacturer, that enables new features or patches security risks. If you get a router, or have a router, it is suggested that you go to the manufacturers website to check for updated firmware on a regular basis.

Another thing becoming prevalent on routers is the ability for wireless connectivity. This is both good and bad. It is good because it allows you to connect your computers to the Internet without having to run wires to them. It is bad because you can’t control how far the signal goes. If you have a router with wireless access, it is suggested that you set the router to only allow connections from computers you have told it to allow using WEP and MAC address filtering. This prevents people from so-called “war driving”, or getting free access to your Internet connection. A good resource for help with this is Broadband reports.

Malware & Viruses

Malware

Here is some information on various types of infection that can be found lurking on the internet.

Viruses

What is a computer virus?
A computer virus is not unlike a biological virus. It passes to a computer system, wrecking havoc on the inner workings of that particular system, then moves on to a different computer, repeating the process, much like what happens with the common cold. Seemingly, once a person you know and are close with, whether it be a co-worker, family member or a friend, catches a cold, it will run rampant throughout everyone’s bodies that they come in contact with. A computer is no different from us in these terms, if it comes in contact with an infected machine, most likely that virus will seize that opportunity to spread itself to a new host, this being your computer.

How does a virus spread itself?
How does a virus accomplish all this you might ask? Well, a virus is a small executable program that attaches itself to other programs. When you then run those programs, the virus itself runs as well, continuing to spread itself and preserve its lifecycle. As an example, say a virus attaches itself to your Microsoft Word program. Every time you then use Word, the virus is activated too, spreading itself to perhaps your favorite chat program. The next time you go to chat, the virus activates itself again and continues to spread. Here, inlays, its strength and its weakness. The strength is what was just outlined a moment ago. The more programs it attaches itself to, the more havoc it can wreck. The weakness is that it must replicate to survive. A virus is only a success if it moves on to a new host. Once you pinpoint a virus and take away its ability to mass-produce, you have defeated it by simply denying it the one thing it must do to live on and thrive, which is to replicate.

How can I protect myself from this?
Protecting yourself against most viruses will involve 3 simple steps. The first thing to do is to download a competent virus protection program. This step is like installing a dead bolt lock on your front door. Sure, you may never get someone trying to break into your house, but if you do, you will sure be glad you have that extra line of defense to thwart such an attack. The peace of mind gained from doing so far outweighs any time or money spent on having to do so. However, just downloading an anti-virus program is not going to be enough. This leads up to our second step, which is to update your anti-virus software. This is nothing more than simple maintenance, much like a flu or an immunization shot that you get before getting sick, to help prevent such things to happen to our systems. It is vital to give your anti-virus software these updates, or shots, to keep your system strong to fend off new types of viruses. The third step is much easier than the first two, as no updates or downloading is required. Simply use common sense. Do not download emails or programs from people you do not know. That is comparable to inviting strangers into your house and leaving them unsupervised and trusting that they won’t steal or damage anything. Sure, some people would not do that, just like some programs or emails from strangers won’t infect your computer with viruses. But you’ll be sorry you made this a common practice once you get one that did infect your system. Your anti-virus software, as great and helpful as it is, is not the perfect solution. It needs your help as well to make sure your computer system stays clean. By keeping the software itself up to date and by applying common sense, you can help yourself stay free of viruses and all the headaches that they involve.

Worms

What is a worm?
A computer worm is a self-replicating program that has the ability to copy itself from one computer to another. Computer worms and viruses are often mistaken for one another. While they do share many similarities, the way they survive is different. A computer worm is independent, as it does not need another program for itself to latch onto like a virus does. What a worm can do to your system can vary greatly. It can delete or alter files stored on your hard drive. It can take control of your email program and use it as a launching pad to send off incredible amounts of email. It just all depends on the creator of the worm and what they set it up to do. A side effect on this is that it can incredibly slow down your system, as long as a worm is active on your computer or network, it is most likely hogging all your bandwidth and system resources in efforts to duplicate itself and carry about its assigned tasks.

How does a worm spread itself?
The main way a worm moves from system to system is via computer networks. Using a network, a worm can duplicate itself over and over. One of the more well known worms, named Code Red, copied itself over and over almost half a million times in a span of 12 hours. The way a worm travels from one system to another is usually through security holes found in the operating system on the machine it is trying to infect. Those that use Windows operating systems NT, 2000 or XP may remember the recent RPC Worm that attacked security holes found in all these operating systems. It scanned your system until it found the appropriate hole it was looking for that is found in all of those operating systems, and then exploits that hole and copies itself onto your system.

How can I protect myself from this?
It may seem like protecting yourself from worms is mission impossible. How are you supposed to know what computer ports a worm is looking for and sees as a potential security hole for it to exploit? Well fortunately, you do not have to. As with protecting yourself against viruses and trojans, running and maintaining your anti-virus software is crucial. You may be thinking that anti-virus software may just look for viruses. However, most reputable protection programs also have worm definitions in their databases. Also, you still need to be careful of what programs you download and use. If you are not familiar with it, do not use it. Doing so can make your system vulnerable to these type of attacks. Another important step is to keep your operating system as up to date as your anti-virus software. Installing those windows updates may seem unimportant and annoying, but failing to do so can be much more aggravating than taking the few moments to keep yourself protected. When Microsoft finds holes that people could possibly take advantage of with these worms, they create these updates to block the holes that the worm could use to infiltrate your system. With these security holes blocked, the worm has no way to access your system and moves on. A few seconds of installing updates will seem like nothing if you should ever have to find yourself with an infected system.

Spyware and Adware

All Internet users should be aware of programs or files that can potentially cause problems for their computer. Spyware/Adware (referred to as Spyware for the rest of this document) is one such type of technology that can compromise your online experience if you are not aware of how to protect yourself and your computer.

What is Spyware?
Spyware is the name for any program that collects information on which web sites you visit on the Internet. If you are unaware that the information is being collected and distributed, the program is “spying”. Companies use Spyware so that they can adjust their ads to show services or merchandise similar to what you have shown interest in before. Also, interested companies can use the data as research information, as if you were participating in a survey you never signed up for.

Should I be concerned?
While it is good to be aware of the effects that Spyware can have on your computer, it is a personal choice whether or not to take action. Some people are very concerned about protecting their privacy on the Internet. Others may only view Spyware as a nuisance. Whether this is viewed as an invasion of privacy or not, the programs can alter your system’s files and cause you some headaches while browsing. Because of this, most people noticing the effects of Spyware want to take action against these programs.

How can I tell if there is Spyware on my computer?
If you see any new or different toolbars on your Internet Explorer program, you could have some form of Spyware on your computer. This is also likely if your homepage has changed unexpectedly, or you are getting a lot of pop-up windows. Spyware can install itself without your consent.

How did this software get on my computer?
Not all Spyware comes in without your permission. One way you may have agreed to install it unknowingly is through accepting the terms of a license agreement. Spyware can be legitimate if you have given your permission to have the data collected from your computer. This information could be hidden in the privacy statement that you agree to when downloading or installing a new program. If you read the fine print, you could find that you are being asked if it is all right to install hidden programs or to give certain individuals or vendors access to your computer. If you allow it, this is a legal agreement to have Spyware on your computer.

Programs that spy on your browsing without your permission can sneak in when you click on certain banners or pop-ups. Be careful when clicking on banner ads while browsing; these can invite illegitimate advertisers to collect data from you.

How do I protect myself?
Certain settings can help keep Spyware programs from leaving cookies on your computer. There are browsing options you can set to allow, deny, or restrict cookies. However, blocking cookies is usually not recommended, as it will allow you to only view sites that do not use cookies. Since blocking cookies causes such restrictions, a better way to protect your computer from Spyware is to download a program to try and block the cookies that you don’t want, and still allow the ones you need. Read all the information offered to make sure you are downloading a legitimate program. The following link gives examples of programs that are available to download that block Spyware:

Please note: This software is not manufactured, nor is any guarantee on its functionality made, by netINS, Inc.. If you experience problems with these programs, please contact the manufacturer of the software directly.

If a Spyware blocker you have downloaded doesn’t work for you, make sure to uninstall it completely before trying to download another one to try. If you don’t, the program can identify a competing program and cause certain files to become inactive.

If you know what’s causing your browsing problems then you know what to try and take action against. With a knowledgeable approach to blocking Spyware, your browsing experience can be an enjoyable one.
Extra Links:

Please note: This software is not manufactured, nor is any guarantee on its functionality made, by netINS, Inc.. If you experience problems with these programs, please contact the manufacturer of the software directly.

Trojan Horse

What is a Trojan horse?
According to legend, during the Trojan War the Greeks gave a large wooden horse to the Trojans. The Greek’s hid soldiers in the horse to sneak into the well-guarded city of Troy. In today’s computer age, a Trojan horse is a destructive program that masquerades as a benign application. For example, a Trojan can be disguised as literally anything, such as a game, music, or movies, ETC.

What can a Trojan horse do?
A Trojan horse can be very destructive and allows anything from damaging your software, accessing your financial accounts, or may even prompt law enforcement to investigate you. A Trojan horse normally installs a back door program. This back door is what a malicious hacker or “cracker” uses to access your computer so that anything they do on your computer will be traced back to you. Examples of this malicious behavior include:

  • Stealing passwords
  • Installing a key logger
  • Running denial of service attacks
  • Disabling your anti-virus
  • Cracking into other computers/networks
  • Installing an e-mail proxy to send unsolicited e-mail
  • Storing Illegal files or pictures

How do I get infected?
Typically Trojan’s are downloaded from a web site, newsgroup, e-mail attachment, or peer to peer network. Trojans are executable files, which means they will have an extension like “.exe”, “.bat”, “.com”, “.vbs”, etc. Use caution when opening executables and only download files from people or oragnizations you trust.

How Can I protect myself from Trojans?
1. Do not open a file unless you know what the program is and trust the sender.
2. Keep your operating system up to date by installing the latest security patches.
3. Protect your computer by running current anti-virus software.
4. Run a firewall. While this does not protect your computer from being infected it helps alert you when strange applications try to access the Internet.
5. Use secure passwords on your computer. Secure passwords should be alphanumeric and at least six characters. This helps to prevent damage when a computer is infected.
6. If you think you may have a Trojan on your computer run a program like “The Cleaner” to try and remove it.

Parental Controls

Partner Communications Cooperative is committed to providing you with the Internet service that is right for you and your family. Included here are methods you can use to keep your children safe from unwanted Internet activities.

The Internet has many uses, not all of which are family oriented. There are many web sites and programs that you may want to prevent your children from viewing. Here are a few tips you can use to protect your family:

  • Use Parental Control software to block unwanted Internet content and to prevent personal information from being transmitted online. Most Parental Control programs also allow you to monitor and/or limit time spent online.
  • Establish strict Internet rules for your children while at home and outside of the home; e.g. school, friend’s house.
  • Spend time online with your child to help establish what you expect from them when online.
  • Place your computer in the family room so you can monitor your child’s online activities.
  • Regularly ask your children about their online friends and activities.
  • Do not permit your child to have an online profile. This prevents your child from being listed in online directories.
  • Block Instant Messages from people you don’t know. Frequently check your child’s friend lists to make sure only approved people are present.
  • For more information please visit www.protectkids.com

Check out these programs to determine if a Parental Control solution is right for your family!

Partner Communications Cooperative is committed to providing you with the Internet service that is right for you and your family. Included here are methods you can use to keep your children safe from unwanted Internet activities.

Please note: This software is not manufactured by, nor is any guarantee on its functionality made by, Partner Communications Cooperative (PARTNER). If you experience problems with these programs, please contact the manufacturer of the software directly.

 


Windows


Apple Mac OS

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Cyber Patrol is filtering software designed to work on your Windows PC that lets you control access to the Internet and programs on your computer. More Info…

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Content Barrier is filtering software designed to work on your Windows or MacOS PC that lets you control access to the Internet and applications on your computer. More Info…

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Content Advisor

Content Advisor is a feature included in Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. It can be used to control the Web sites that you can view. This option is not nearly as full-featured as Cyber Patrol or Content Barrier. More Info…

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Content Advisor

Content Advisor is a feature included in Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. It can be used to control the Web sites that you can view. This option is not nearly as full-featured as Cyber Patrol or Content Barrier. More Info…

PARTNER is making this software available as a service to our customers. PARTNER is an Internet Service Provider, not a software vendor. PARTNER makes no claim of fitness to purpose, nor any specific or implied warranty with regard to the software. For software support, you should contact the author, or vendor, of each respective software package. You may also choose not to use this software and obtain your own software and support through commercial software vendors. PARTNER. is not responsible for any loss of data or downtime associated with installing any or all of the software provided.